All Feature Reports

As Americans begin shopping again for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act on Saturday, they’ll be wrangling with premiums, deductibles, out-of-pocket costs and other vague and confusing insurance-speak.

Believe it or not, that’s the easy part compared to figuring out what the overall cost of health care is.

Smooth sailing. The administration promises and outside experts expect that this year’s open enrollment period on the health insurance marketplaces will be markedly less glitchy and balky than last. Consumers will begin to find out if that’s true tomorrow when the marketplaces open for 2015 coverage.

The state health department expects 350 thousand new people to enroll in insurance through the New York State Marketplace before February 15th.

The second Open Enrollment for the state health insurance exchange begins Saturday.

The state health department expects 350 thousand new people to enroll in insurance through the New York State Marketplace before February 15th.

 

The second Open Enrollment for the state health insurance exchange begins Saturday.

 

What was once considered a ground-breaking U.S. study to track the health of children from birth to adulthood may be stopped before its official start, causing alarm for advocates and researchers who say its findings are crucial to developing prevention strategies for childhood illnesses like asthma, autism and attention deficit disorder.

Millions of low-income children are failing to get the free preventive exams and screenings guaranteed by Medicaid and the Obama administration is not doing enough to fix the problem, according to a federal watchdog report.

A majority of respondents to a recent survey report satisfaction with their new health insurance through the New York State of Health Marketplace.

Last month, Harris Poll conducted an online survey of 250 New York State residents new to insurance through the state exchange.

92 percent of those polled report being somewhat or completely satisfied with their coverage.

Andrea Borondy Kitt’s husband Dan lived for a year and a half after his October 2011 lung cancer diagnosis. She’s convinced, however, that he might have lived longer had Medicare paid for a low-dose CT scan of his lungs that could have caught his cancer in the early stages.

Haven’t thought about the health care law for a while? Now’s the time.

Mind the gap. When the 2015 open enrollment period begins on Nov. 15 for plans sold on the individual market, consumers should act promptly to avoid a gap in coverage.