All Feature Reports

BELLEVILLE, Ill. – Nearly as old as the railroad that slices through this southern Illinois city just east of the Mississippi River, St. Elizabeth’s Hospital has been a downtown bedrock since 1875.

There's a pressing need in Rochester and the Finger Lakes for more services to help kids and teens who need behavioral health care.

That according to Dr.  Mike Scharf from the University of Rochester Medical Center.

The Syracuse VA Medical Center is seeing more than nine in 10 patients in a timely fashion, according to a review of six months of patient appointment records, but an “anomaly” in one area of care shows veterans waiting more than three months to be seen by a doctor.

“I started out in Southern France and ended up in Belgium," is how Palmer Gaetano describes his army service in World War II. The 92-year old lives in a hospice facility in Spencerport, near his daughter and her family.

By law, many U.S. insurance providers that offer mental health care are required to cover it just as they would cancer or diabetes treatment.

The National Institute of Mental Health unveiled a five-year strategic plan emphasizing research it hopes will ultimately give clinicians a better understanding of what mental illness looks like inside the brain — before a patient shows outward sym

Readers continue to have questions about how the health insurance marketplaces work and coverage requirements there. This week I answered some recent queries.

Whether a patient is in the hospital for an organ transplant, an appendectomy or to have a baby, one complaint is common: the gown.

You know the one. It might as well have been stitched together with paper towels and duct tape, and it usually leaves the wearer’s behind hanging out.

SAN FRANCISCO — Dan Swangard knows what death looks like.

As a physician, he has seen patients die in hospitals, hooked to morphine drips and overcome with anxiety. He has watched death drag on for weeks or months as terrified relatives stand by helplessly.

More than a dozen insurers offer plans on the New York health insurance marketplace, and depending on where they live, shoppers may have more than a hundred products to choose from. But despite being spoiled for choice in many ways, there’s one popular feature that most New Yorkers can’t find in any of the health plans offered on their state exchange: out-of-network coverage.