Shakespeare Uncovered

Shakespeare Uncovered

Fri, 10/12/2018 - 9:00pm - 11:00pm

"Much Ado About Nothing" hosted by Helen Hunt

Courtesy of Blakeway Productions

Iconic performances and new analysis to tell the stories behind the stories of Shakespeare’s famous works. 

The final season investigates “Much Ado About Nothing,” “The Merchant of Venice,” “Measure for Measure,” “Julius Caesar,” “The Winter’s Tale” and “Richard III.” Shakespeare Uncovered, airing Fridays at 9 p.m. on WXXI-TV October 12-October 26, reveals not just the elements in the play, but the history of the play itself. What sparked the creation of each of these works? Where did Shakespeare find his plots and what new forms of theater did he forge? What cultural, political and religious factors influenced his writing? How have the plays been staged and interpreted from Shakespeare’s time to now? Why at different times has each play been popular — or ignored? Why has this body of work endured so thoroughly? What, in the end, makes Shakespeare unique? 

The ambitious series concludes with celebrated new hosts Helen Hunt, F. Murray Abraham, Romola Garai, Brian Cox, Simon Russell Beale and Sir Antony Sher, who seamlessly weave their personal passions with history, biography, iconic performances and new analysis to tell the stories behind the stories of Shakespeare’s famous works. Each host has a personal connection with the play presented: Helen Hunt received rave reviews for her portrayal of Beatrice in “Much Ado About Nothing” at Los Angeles’ Kirk Douglas Theatre; F. Murray Abraham starred as Shylock in a touring production of “The Merchant of Venice;”

Episode one: Much Ado About Nothing with Helen Hunt 
Explore this exquisite comedy of comparison and contrast, as well as what the ultimate "ado" about "nothing" really means, with Academy Award-winning actress Helen Hunt. Much Ado About Nothing is one of 15 plays that Shakespeare set in Italy.

Episode two: The Merchant of Venice with F. Murray Abraham
F. Murray Abraham untangles the controversies surrounding “The Merchant of Venice,” addressing the ubiquitous anti-Semitism that characterized Europe in Shakespeare’s time.

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