America Abroad: Countering Violent Extremism: An International Town Hall

America Abroad: Countering Violent Extremism: An International Town Hall

Sun, 08/09/2015 - 9:00pm

How Europe and the U.S. are dealing with violent extremism, especially in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo attack as well as the recent shooting in Garland, Texas. Tune into AM 1370 on Sundays at 9 p.m. beginning August 2, 2015 for America Abroad, anchored by Jacki Lyden in Philadelphia and Eleanor Beardsley at NPR in Berlin.

On Sunday, August 9 at 9 p.m. America Abroad: Countering Violent Extremism: An International Town Hall is joined by audiences in Philadelphia and Berlin Germany to discuss how Europe and the U.S. are dealing with violent extremism, especially in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo attack as well as the recent shooting in Garland, Texas. We'll look at how law enforcement, policy makers, and Muslim and non-Muslim community groups are dealing with issues around security, civil liberties, and freedom of speech both locally and nationally. Expert guests will include Mehreen Farooq, senior fellow with the World Organization For Resource Development and Education which works to prevent radicalization and extremism; Zainab al-Suwaij, co-founder and executive director of the American Islamic Congress - a non-profit working to support human and civil rights for Muslim and non-Muslim populations; Doctor Henning Hoff, editor-at-large of a new online Berlin policy journal; and Khaldun al Saadi, speaker for the Dresden Islamic center and Mosque, and a project coordinator for the Young Islam Conference in Berlin.

On Sunday, August 16 at 9 p.m., Madeleine Brand anchors America Abroad: Poaching and Terrorism:The Race to Protect Wildlife and National Security that looks at endangered species and poaching around the world.  Demand for wildlife products like ivory and rhino horn has skyrocketed in recent years, and terrorists and other criminal groups are taking advantage. Poaching rates are up dramatically, and in some areas, elephants and rhinos are on the verge of extinction. Meanwhile, sale of their tusks and horns is bringing in billions of dollars - revenue on par with the drug trade and human trafficking. Law enforcement has not yet caught up with this growing trade, so for criminal groups, the rewards are high and the risk is very low. But recently, governments, law enforcement agencies, and conservation groups have banded together like never before to protect these endangered creatures and stop this revenue stream for the bad actors who are benefitting from their demise.



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