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Netanyahu's Legacy After 12 Years As Israel's Prime Minister

WXXI US News - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 4:27pm
Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Though the outcome of the vote in Israel's Parliament yesterday was anticipated, it was not without tumult. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: (Non-English language spoken). (CROSSTALK) AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: Amid the heckling and by a one-vote margin, Naftali Bennett became prime minister of Israel, ousting Benjamin Netanyahu. Bennett is a former ally and aide to Netanyahu. They're both right-wing politicians. But Bennett is backed by a coalition from the left, right and center that was united in the desire for a new leader, someone not so divisive as Netanyahu or facing a corruption trial, as he is. SHAPIRO: Netanyahu answered with a speech calling the new government dangerous and vowing to continue fighting to return his Likud Party to power. He punctuated the point in English. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) BENJAMIN NETANYAHU: (Non-English language spoken). We'll be back soon. We'll be back.

Former U.S. Ambassador To Russia Offers Advice, Lessons Ahead Of Biden-Putin Summit

WXXI US News - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 4:27pm
Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST: I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Geneva, on the shores of Lac Leman. This is - the lake cuts right through the heart of the city. We have come down to the beach today, which is crowded, as you can probably hear. (SOUNDBITE OF BEACH AMBIENCE) KELLY: We actually picked this spot because about a hundred yards away is Villa la Grange. This is this grand 18th century villa. It is the site of the Biden-Putin summit, which is coming up in two days' time. And they've got security perimeter and checkpoints already set up. Journalists are rolling into town. Diplomats are rolling into town. Among them, Michael McFaul. MICHAEL MCFAUL: Former diplomats are rolling into town, yes, even. KELLY: Former diplomat - yeah, you were the U.S. ambassador to Russia back in 2012 to 2014. MCFAUL: Right. KELLY: And I think the last time I saw you in person was in Helsinki. MCFAUL: Yes, that was a very memorable one. KELLY: It was, indeed. Well, let's start

Media Leaders Met With Merrick Garland To Discuss Secret Leak Investigations

WXXI US News - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 4:27pm
Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Attorney General Merrick Garland met today with top executives and lawyers from three major news outlets - The New York Times, The Washington Post and CNN. Under the last administration, the Justice Department secretly sought phone and email records from journalists at all three organizations, apparently part of a hunt for the source of embarrassing leaks. NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik joins us now with more. Hi, David. DAVID FOLKENFLIK, BYLINE: Hey, Ari. SHAPIRO: What happened at this meeting today? FOLKENFLIK: Well, the meeting was said to be off the record, but Attorney General Merrick Garland and the Justice Department released a statement essentially saying they are making guarantees that the Justice Department no longer seek to compel through the courts that either news organizations had to turn over reporters' records or the metadata surrounding, you know, their actual phone calls or their actual emails, so

Biden Has Yet To End The Business Of Detaining Immigrants As He Promised, Critics Say

WXXI US News - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 4:27pm
Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: Since the campaign trail, President Biden has made clear his intention to put an end to the business of detaining immigrants for profit. Hundreds of privately run detention centers across the U.S. hold immigrants who are in the country illegally. But immigrant advocates say the administration is not following through on Biden's promise. NPR's Joel Rose reports. JOEL ROSE, BYLINE: When President Biden visited the battleground state of Georgia for a rally to celebrate his 100th day in office, immigrant advocates were there to protest. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: End detention now. End detention now. ROSE: Normally, the president would just ignore the hecklers until security could escort them out. But that is not what happened in Atlanta. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN: I agree with you. I'm working on it, man. Give me another five days. ROSE: Not only did Biden engage with the

Race, Drugs And Sentencing At the Supreme Court

WXXI US News - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 3:36pm
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that some crack cocaine offenders sentenced to harsh prison terms more than a decade ago cannot get their sentences reduced under a federal law adopted with the purpose of doing just that. At issue in the case was the long and now notorious history of sentencing under the 1986 Anti-Drug Abuse Act, which established harsh mandatory prison sentences based on the amount of drugs that the defendant possessed or sold. The triggering amount, however, was different for crack cocaine used most often by Black people, and powder cocaine, used most often by whites. Indeed, the ratio was 100-to-1, so that a five-year mandatory minimum penalty, for instance, was triggered by possession of 5 grams of crack, whereas the same penalty was triggered by 500 grams of powder cocaine. Nine years after enactment of these mandatory penalties, the U.S. Sentencing Commission found these disparities unjustified, and by 2010 Congress passed new legislation to reduce the

Rochester's Black deaf community speaks up about barriers to health care

Move to Include coverage on WXXINews.org - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 3:05pm
The pandemic has shed light on disparities within the Black community. In addition to systematic racism, lack of access to health information and health literacy, there are additional barriers that affect Black deaf people who are a minority in an already marginalized group. When LeeAnne Valentine walks into a medical facility, she is hyper-aware of these barriers. Valentine is a deaf Black woman and communicates using American Sign Language. She said she ran into a problem with an interpreter last year when she sought treatment for a gallbladder issue. She said she could not eat or sleep, and wanted an MRI. At the doctor’s office, Valentine said her interpreter wasn’t helpful. “Her tone of voice was not very inflected,” Valentine said, who described the interpreter’s signing as “very neutral” and “monotone.” That barrier in communication can affect a deaf person's experience at the doctor and overall trust in the medical community. For Black deaf people, the mistrust is sometimes more

Rochester's Black deaf community speaks up about barriers to healthcare

WXXI US News - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 3:05pm
The pandemic has shed light on disparities within the Black community. In addition to systematic racism, lack of access to health information and health literacy, there are additional barriers that affect Black deaf people who are a minority in an already marginalized group. When LeeAnne Valentine walks into a medical facility she is hyper-aware of these barriers. Valentine is a deaf Black woman and communicates using American Sign Language. She said she ran into a problem with an interpreter last year when she sought treatment for a gallbladder issue. She said she could not eat or sleep, and wanted an MRI. At the doctor’s office, Valentine said her interpreter wasn’t helpful. “Her tone of voice was not very inflected,” Valentine said, who described the interpreter’s signing as “very neutral” and “monotone.” That barrier in communication can affect a deaf person's experience at the doctor and overall trust in the medical community. For Black deaf people, the mistrust is sometimes more

The U.S. Bans Importing Dogs From 113 Countries After Rise In False Rabies Records

WXXI US News - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 3:02pm
The U.S. is banning the importation of dogs from more than 100 countries for at least a year because of a sharp increase in the number of puppies imported into the country with fraudulent rabies vaccination certificates. "We're doing this to make sure that we protect the health and safety of dogs that are imported into the United States, as well as protect the public's health," Dr. Emily Pieracci of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tells NPR. The pandemic prompted a surge of pet adoptions, including puppies, as Americans sought companionship while they hunkered down in their homes to protect themselves from COVID-19. That was accompanied by an increase in dog importations, along with a jump in dogs entering the country with falsified or fraudulent rabies certificates, Pieracci says. During 2020, the CDC discovered more than 450 dogs arriving in the U.S. with falsified or fraudulent rabies certificates, a 52% increase compared with the previous two years, she says. "Early

The U.S. Bans Importing Dogs From 113 Countries After Rise In False Rabies Records

NPR Health Blog - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 3:01pm

A surge in pet adoptions has increased demand for dogs imported from around the world. Most are fine, but federal officials turned up 450 dogs in 2020 with false records — 50% more than in 2019.

(Image credit: Biophoto Associates/Science Source)

Categories: NPR Blogs

Israel Has Become The 1st Country To Ban The Sale Of Most Fur Clothing

WXXI US News - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 2:47pm
The Israeli government has banned the sale of fur in the fashion industry, becoming the first country to outlaw the controversial clothing material that opponents say leads to the slaughter of millions of animals each year. Gila Gamliel, now the former minister of environmental protection following her party's defeat Sunday in the Israeli Knesset, called the fur trade for the fashion industry "immoral and unnecessary" when she signed the ban last week . "Together, we will make the Israeli fashion market more environmentally friendly and do kindness to animals!" Gamliel tweeted . Israel's ban on the sale of fur will take effect in six months. Yet it's unclear just how far the ban will go toward preventing fur from coming onto the market in Israel, given that the country's warm climate can make wearing fur impractical. An exemption to the ban will also allow sales to continue for ultra-Orthodox Jewish men, many of whom wear fur head coverings as a matter of their faith. A religious

Connections: How Me2/Orchestra is working to eliminate stigma tied to mental illness

WXXI US News - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 2:18pm
Founders of the Me2/Orchestra say it is the only classical music organization in the world created by and for people with mental illness and those who support them. The conductor, Ronald Braunstein, is an internationally renowned maestro who reinvented his career after struggling with his own mental health diagnosis. Now, the orchestra has branches in several cities around the world. The story of Me2/Orchestra is told in a documentary called "Orchestrating Change." It will be screened as part of the Reel Mind Film Series and the Eastman Performing Arts Medicine program next week. But first, the orchestra's founders, one of the filmmakers, a member of the orchestra, and a mental health professional join us to discuss how a project like this can help break down the stigma tied to mental illness. Our guests: Ronald Braunstein , co-founder and music director of Me2/Orchestra Caroline Whiddon , co-founder and executive director of Me2/Orchestra Marek Lorenc, Me2/Orchestra (Burlington)

Connections: Can technology predict if relationships will be successful?

WXXI US News - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 2:14pm
What does the future of dating look like? Researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara think they have an idea. A project at the Computational Mate Choice Lab at USCB involves uploading personalities and relationship ideas and then allowing simulated characters to play out their relationships in the virtual world. Assistant professor Daniel Conroy-Beam says what happens in that virtual space could predict what may happen with couples in real life. His goal, he says, is to help people build happier relationships. Would you put your relationship to this kind of test? If you're single, would you trust this kind of technology to help you make dating decisions? Is this all too "Black Mirror"? Our guests discuss it: Daniel Conroy-Beam , assistant professor and head of the Computational Mate Choice Lab at the University of California, Santa Barbara Shadi Kafi , teacher and writer Nicole Rahn , young professional

En crisis de salud mental, el 911 ahora no siempre responde con policías

Latest Updates From Kaiser Health News - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 1:07pm

Cuando Kiki Radermacher, terapeuta de salud mental, llegó a una casa de Missoula, Montana, por una llamada de emergencia al 911 a fines de mayo, el hombre que había pedido ayuda estaba atrincheado en una esquina, gritándole a los policías.

 La casa que estaba alquilando iba a venderse. Había llamado al 911 cuando el miedo de quedarse sin hogar lo hizo tener pensamientos suicidas.

“Le pregunté: ‘¿Quieres sentarte conmigo?'”, recordó Radermacher, miembro del equipo móvil de respuesta a crisis de la ciudad. Luego ayudó al hombre a encontrar un servicio de apoyo. “Realmente queremos empoderar a las personas para encontrar soluciones”.

Missoula comenzó a enviar a este equipo especial en llamadas de emergencia de salud mental en noviembre como un proyecto piloto, y el próximo mes el programa se volverá permanente.

Es una de las seis iniciativas de respuesta móviles a crisis en Montana, que comenzó como una prueba en 2019. Y este año, cuatro gobiernos locales más solicitaron subvenciones estatales para crear estos equipos.

A nivel nacional, más comunidades están creando unidades en las que los profesionales de salud mental son el principal auxilio a las crisis psiquiátricas en lugar de los policías, aunque no existe un recuento oficial de cuántos equipos están funcionando.

Y más apoyo está en camino. El paquete de ayuda de covid que el presidente Joe Biden firmó en marzo ofrece a los estados fondos de Medicaid para poner en marcha estos servicios. Para julio de 2022, está programado el lanzamiento de una línea directa nacional 988, inspirada en el 911, para que las personas se comuniquen con especialistas capacitados en prevención del suicidio y consejeros de salud mental.

Estudios sugieren que estos servicios permiten a las personas en crisis obtener ayuda en lugar de ser transportadas esposadas. Pero hay debate sobre cuál es el mejor modelo a implementar, quién debe responder a la emergencia y, aunque hubiera respuestas, no todas las comunidades pueden costear y contar con estos equipos de salud mental.

“No sé si existe un consenso sobre cuál es el mejor enfoque en este momento”, dijo Amy Watson, profesora de trabajo social en la Universidad de Wisconsin-Milwaukee que ha estudiado este tipo de intervención en crisis. “Necesitamos avanzar para averiguar cuáles son los elementos importantes de estos modelos”.

La Administración Federal de Servicios de Salud Mental y Abuso de Sustancias establece expectativas mínimas para los equipos, como incluir un profesional de salud y conectar a las personas con más servicios, si es necesario. Idealmente, sugieren las pautas, el equipo debe incluir un especialista en respuesta a crisis que haya experimentado personalmente problemas de salud mental, y el equipo debe responder a las llamadas sin la aplicación de la ley.

Aún así, los equipos de respuesta a crisis varían significativamente en su composición y enfoque. Durante más de 40 años, el Departamento de Policía de Los Ángeles ha sido pionero desplegando equipos en los que agentes de policía y terapeutas trabajan juntos.

Un programa de Eugene, Oregon, que se ha replicado en todo Estados Unidos, tiene grupos formados por un experto en intervención en crisis junto con una enfermera, un paramédico o un técnico médico de emergencia. En Georgia, los despachadores de emergencia del 911 dirigen las llamadas a un centro de crisis en todo el estado que puede desplegar unidades móviles que incluyen profesionales con experiencia en trabajo social, asesoramiento y enfermería.

En Montana, los equipos se basan en departamentos de aplicación de la ley, instalaciones médicas u hogares de crisis.

“La respuesta móvil a las crisis, en cualquier formato, se está convirtiendo cada vez más en la norma”, dijo Kari Auclair, directora de área del Western Montana Mental Health Center, un programa de tratamiento sin fines de lucro. “En algunas comunidades, será el grupo de la iglesia el que será parte de una respuesta a la crisis, porque a ese grupo va la gente y eso es lo que tienen”.

Los defensores explican que los modelos mixtos funcionan: los médicos pueden reconocer una caída de azúcar en sangre de un diabético que podría imitar el uso indebido de sustancias o una crisis de salud mientras que la policía puede estar atenta al peligro si aumentan las tensiones.

Muchos equipos de crisis todavía trabajan directamente con las fuerzas del orden, a veces respondiendo juntos cuando se les llama o permaneciendo en la escena después de que los oficiales se van. En Montana, por ejemplo, el 61% de las llamadas que manejaron los equipos de crisis también involucraron a la policía, según datos estatales.

Zoe Barnard, administradora de la división de trastornos mentales y adicciones de Montana, dijo que su estado aún está estableciendo una línea de base para lo que funciona bien. Incluso después de haber elaborado un estándar, agregó, los gobiernos locales seguirán necesitando flexibilidad en la forma en que configuran sus programas.

En algunas áreas, reclutar trabajadores de salud mental para tales equipos es casi imposible. Los datos federales muestran que 125 millones de personas viven en áreas con escasez de profesionales de salud mental, un problema mayor en las zonas rurales.

En todo Estados Unidos, con este tipo de trabajos de alto estrés que a menudo se pagan a través de subvenciones improvisadas, retener al personal es un desafío.

Ser flexible será clave para los programas a medida que se desarrollen, dijo Jeffrey Coots, quien dirige una iniciativa en el John Jay College of Criminal Justice en la ciudad de Nueva York para prevenir encarcelamientos innecesarios.

“Estamos tratando de encontrar una salida a las desigualdades históricas en los servicios de atención de salud mental”, dijo Coots. “Lo mejor que puede hacer es ejecutar este proyecto de prueba y luego adaptar el equipo en función de los datos”.

Y para las personas que necesitan ayuda, tener una alternativa a un oficial de policía puede significar una gran diferencia, dijo Tyler Steinebach, director ejecutivo de Hope Health Alliance Inc., que ofrece capacitación en crisis conductuales para médicos en todo Montana. Lo sabe de primera mano porque tiene trastorno de estrés bipolar y postraumático, y ha tenido que llamar al 911 cuando su propia salud mental se ha desplomado.

Dan Springer, alguacil del condado de Gallatin, en Montana, también notó los beneficios después que dos profesionales de salud mental comenzaron a responder a las llamadas al 911 en Bozeman y sus alrededores en 2019. Aunque los oficiales de su departamento están capacitados en intervención en crisis, dijo que eso solo llega hasta cierto punto.

“Cuando escucho a los agentes decir que el proveedor de salud mental es un regalo del cielo, o que llegaron y pudieron ampliar las capacidades de respuesta, eso significa mucho para mí”, dijo Springer.

“A veces llegamos a una escena y hay tres patrulleros, una ambulancia y un camión de bomberos para una persona que está sufriendo un ataque de pánico”, dijo Erica Gotcher, médica del equipo de respuesta de Missoula. “Una de las mejores cosas que podemos hacer es evaluar brevemente la situación y cancelar todos esos otros recursos. Pueden ir a combatir incendios; pueden ir a luchar contra el crimen. Nosotros somos los que tenemos que estar aquí “.

Pero hay cosas en las que trabajar, por ejemplo, adónde llevar a las personas que necesitan un lugar para recuperarse. Y más personal: el turno del equipo de salud mental de Missoula termina a las 8pm. A la noche, los policías vuelven a estar solos.

¿Necesitas ayuda? Si tú mismo o alguien que conoces está viviendo una crisis, por favor llama al National Suicide Prevention Lifeline al 1-800-273-TALK (8255) o contacta al Crisis Text Line texteando TALK al 741741.

KHN (Kaiser Health News) is a national newsroom that produces in-depth journalism about health issues. Together with Policy Analysis and Polling, KHN is one of the three major operating programs at KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation). KFF is an endowed nonprofit organization providing information on health issues to the nation.

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Cuomo says state one step closer to vaccination milestone  

WXXI Capitol Bureau Report - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 1:07pm
Gov. Andrew Cuomo says the state is one-tenth of a percentage point away from his goal of having 70% of New Yorkers age 18 and over obtain at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccination. Cuomo says Sunday’s vaccination numbers show the rate at 69.9%. But, he says, the percentages vary greatly by zip code, with rates in some low-income urban and rural areas as low as 38.8%. The governor says local governments need to focus on those areas and give it "one more push." “Go door to door,” Cuomo said. “Go to churches, go to social events, go to community events.” The governor says when the state’s vaccination rate reaches 70% for people age 18 and over getting at least one dose, he plans to hold a celebration. Currently, the number of adults who were fully vaccinated as of two weeks ago, is lower, at 60.1%. Cuomo, speaking Monday at an event in Syracuse, also announced that because statewide positivity rate continues to be low — .41 % on Sunday — the New York State Fair will open later his
Categories: WXXI News

Cuomo says state one step closer to vaccination milestone  

WXXI US News - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 1:07pm
Gov. Andrew Cuomo says the state is one-tenth of a percentage point away from his goal of having 70% of New Yorkers age 18 and over obtain at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccination. Cuomo says Sunday’s vaccination numbers show the rate at 69.9%. But, he says, the percentages vary greatly by zip code, with rates in some low-income urban and rural areas as low as 38.8%. The governor says local governments need to focus on those areas and give it "one more push." “Go door to door,” Cuomo said. “Go to churches, go to social events, go to community events.” The governor says when the state’s vaccination rate reaches 70% for people age 18 and over getting at least one dose, he plans to hold a celebration. Currently, the number of adults who were fully vaccinated as of two weeks ago, is lower, at 60.1%. Cuomo, speaking Monday at an event in Syracuse, also announced that because statewide positivity rate continues to be low — .41 % on Sunday — the New York State Fair will open later his

Investigators Find Remains of 17 Victims Under A Suspected Serial Killer's House

WXXI US News - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 10:49am
MEXICO CITY — Investigators digging under the house of a suspected serial killer on the outskirts of Mexico City said Saturday they have found 3,787 bone fragments so far, apparently belonging to 17 different victims. Prosecutors in the State of Mexico, which borders Mexico City, suggested the grisly finds may not end there. In excavations carried out since May 17, authorities have dug up the floors of the house where the suspect lived. They now plan to extend the search to the soil beneath several other rooms he rented out on the same property. ID cards and other possessions from people who disappeared years ago were found at the junk-filled home, suggesting the trail of killings may go back years. The number of bone fragments found underneath concrete floors at the suspect's home would imply the corpses may have been hacked into tiny pieces. That could make sense: the suspect, identified by prosecutors only as "Andrés," was formerly a butcher and in fact sectioned and filleted his

Family Of Alton Sterling Has Accepted $4.5 Million For His Killing By Police

WXXI US News - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 10:34am
BATON ROUGE, La. — The children of a Black man killed by police in Louisiana's capital city five years ago have accepted a $4.5 million settlement from the local government, the man's family and the city's mayor said Friday. Alton Sterling's 2016 shooting by a Baton Rouge police officer was captured on video and sparked anger and protests in the city's Black community. Sterling's family issued a statement Friday confirming acceptance of the settlement after news outlets reported that court documents showed they had moved to have the suit dismissed last month. The settlement had been approved earlier in the year by the Metro Council for Baton Rouge and East Baton Rouge Parish. "This settlement, which was reached through hard work and collaboration between attorneys for Mr. Sterling's family and the Baton Rouge City Council, will allow the city to heal and provide a pathway for Mr. Sterling's children to be provided for financially," said the statement issued through the family's

Coming up on Connections: Monday, June 14

WXXI US News - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 8:57am
First hour: Can technology predict if relationships will be successful? Second hour: How Me2/Orchestra is working to eliminate stigma tied to mental illness

Coming up on Connections: Monday, June 14

WXXI US News - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 8:57am
First hour: Can technology predict if relationships will be successful? Second hour: How Me2/Orchestra is working to eliminate stigma tied to mental illness

Coming up on Connections: Monday, June 14

WXXI US News - Mon, 06/14/2021 - 8:56am
First hour: Can technology predict if relationships will be successful? Second hour: How Me2/Orchestra is working to eliminate stigma tied to mental illness
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