News aggregator

Former Secretary Of State On 2 Decades Of U.S.-Putin Summits

WXXI US News - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 4:29pm
Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST: And I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Geneva, site of so much diplomacy between the U.S. and Russia over the decades, including right here. This is the United Nations HQ in Geneva. The fountains have just come on around us, looking down a huge line of all the flags of all the member states. This is where in 1955, Eisenhower and Khrushchev sat down and were trying to sort out tensions after Stalin died. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) ED HERLIHY: ...What was to be known as the Geneva spirit. Here, President Eisenhower electrified the world with his dramatic proposal of the open sky inspection of military installations as a barrier to unexpected attack. KELLY: Well, this week, of course, the city hosts the current Russian and American leaders. All the history made us hungry for the long view. And so we've called Madeleine Albright, secretary of state from 1997 to 2001, who has some history of her own negotiating with the Kremlin.

From The Streets Of Tehran: Iranians' Thoughts Ahead Of Friday's Vote For President

WXXI US News - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 4:29pm
MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST: At this precise moment outside Russia's Permanent Mission to the U.N. here in Geneva, there's a big steel fence, giant shrubs blocking the view. I'm counting one, two, three, four, five uniformed security guards keeping an eye on us. We can't see who's coming and going from behind these big gates - diplomats. You also have to wonder about spies, if this is like many diplomatic outposts around the world, which prompted us to wonder - are intelligence officers out in full force here in the city as the American and Russian delegations hit town? Well, we decided to make a phone call to Daniel Hoffman, former CIA station chief - served five years in Moscow, here to talk about what espionage efforts may or may not be underway. Hey there. DANIEL HOFFMAN: Hey, good to be on the program. KELLY: So let's fact-check what I just said. Is it safe to say the SVR - that is Russia's foreign intelligence service - that they are here in force? HOFFMAN: Oh, yeah. They're there in

House Democrats Ramping Up Probes Into Jan. 6 Insurrection

WXXI US News - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 4:29pm
MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST: At this precise moment outside Russia's Permanent Mission to the U.N. here in Geneva, there's a big steel fence, giant shrubs blocking the view. I'm counting one, two, three, four, five uniformed security guards keeping an eye on us. We can't see who's coming and going from behind these big gates - diplomats. You also have to wonder about spies, if this is like many diplomatic outposts around the world, which prompted us to wonder - are intelligence officers out in full force here in the city as the American and Russian delegations hit town? Well, we decided to make a phone call to Daniel Hoffman, former CIA station chief - served five years in Moscow, here to talk about what espionage efforts may or may not be underway. Hey there. DANIEL HOFFMAN: Hey, good to be on the program. KELLY: So let's fact-check what I just said. Is it safe to say the SVR - that is Russia's foreign intelligence service - that they are here in force? HOFFMAN: Oh, yeah. They're there in

MacKenzie Scott Is Giving Away Another $2.7 Billion To 286 Organizations

WXXI US News - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 3:35pm
Updated June 15, 2021 at 5:01 PM ET Saying that she's troubled by the increasing concentration of wealth, philanthropist MacKenzie Scott says she is giving away another $2.7 billion of her fortune to 286 nonprofit organizations. Scott, who divorced from Amazon founder Jeff Bezos in 2019, made the announcement in a blog post on the website Medium. She has so far given away more than $8 billion in three rounds of funding revealed in the same manner. Her net worth is estimated to be nearly $60 billion . In her divorce from Bezos, Scott received a 4% stake in Amazon. But shares of the company's stock rose sharply during the pandemic, and despite giving away billions, Scott's wealth keeps growing. Her net worth, estimated at $36.1 billion in October 2019, has increased by some $23 billion since then. Scott is now married to Seattle teacher Dan Jewett. Jewett joined Scott in signing the Giving Pledge, a commitment by wealthy individuals to give away a majority of their money. In her blog

Cuomo celebrates COVID-19 milestone by lifting more mandates

WXXI Capitol Bureau Report - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 3:27pm
Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced that he’s lifting all remaining state COVID-19 restrictions, including requirements for masks and social distancing, and capacity limits at events, now that New York has reached the governor’s goal of 70% of adults receiving at least one dose of the vaccine. Cuomo, in a campaign style event held before a cheering crowd of union leaders and others at the World Trade Center, said the goal was reached sometime on Monday, according to numbers compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Seventy percent vaccination,” Cuomo announced to applause. “It is the national goal and we hit it ahead of schedule.” The number of New Yorkers who are fully vaccinated, meaning they have received all of their required doses two or more weeks ago, is significantly lower, at around 50.3%, according to numbers from the State Health Department and the CDC. That’s far less than what scientists say is enough people vaccinated to reach herd immunity from the virus.
Categories: WXXI News

Cuomo celebrates COVID-19 milestone by lifting more mandates

WXXI US News - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 3:27pm
Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced that he’s lifting all remaining state COVID-19 restrictions, including requirements for masks and social distancing, and capacity limits at events, now that New York has reached the governor’s goal of 70% of adults receiving at least one dose of the vaccine. Cuomo, in a campaign style event held before a cheering crowd of union leaders and others at the World Trade Center, said the goal was reached sometime on Monday, according to numbers compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Seventy percent vaccination,” Cuomo announced to applause. “It is the national goal and we hit it ahead of schedule.” The number of New Yorkers who are fully vaccinated, meaning they have received all of their required doses two or more weeks ago, is significantly lower, at around 50.3%, according to numbers from the State Health Department and the CDC. That’s far less than what scientists say is enough people vaccinated to reach herd immunity from the virus.

A Small Florida Town Accidentally Sold Its Water Tower For $55,000

WXXI US News - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 3:14pm
When business owner Bobby Read approached the Brooksville City Council about purchasing a municipal building at the base of the small Florida city's water tower, he didn't expect the water tower to come with it. Read discovered the mistake after the property had been sold to him for $55,000. The certified personal trainer intended to turn the building, which various city departments used for storage, into a personal training studio named Downtown Athletics. But when he went to the county property appraiser's office to get an address for his new business, the county told him he'd received much more than the building — several thousand gallons more. "I immediately went through the necessary steps to deed the water tower back to the city of Brooksville," Read said in an email to NPR. "The city's intention was to sell me a split section of the parcel with a small garage." The surprise purchase boiled down to a mix-up over the legal description for the property. Mark Kutney, the Brooksville

Connections: Discussing how racial disparities affect rates of domestic violence

WXXI US News - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 2:33pm
According to the Women of Color Network, approximately four out of every ten non-Hispanic Black women have experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner. Racial disparities in economics, education, criminal justice – as well as cultural factors – contribute to those rates. They also lead to challenges when it comes to victims seeking and accessing support services. This hour, we discuss how racial disparities and social determinants affect rates of domestic violence, and our guests weigh in on what they would like to see in terms of support and resources. In studio: Meaghan de Chateauvieux , president and CEO of Willow Domestic Violence Center Kesha Carter , chief diversity officer for Coordinated Care Services, Inc. Geena Cruz, CEO of Heels of Greatness George Payne, case manager for Willow Domestic Violence Center

Connections: Members of Rochester City Council on the city's proposed budget

WXXI US News - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 2:30pm
Rochester City Council will vote on the proposed budget on Tuesday. Before they do, several members discuss the budget on Connections: how much money for policing? How large of a police force? How much money for the Police Accountability Board? What about the Person In Crisis teams, social services, community building, and more? Our guests: Mary Lupien , member of Rochester City Council Jose Peo , member of Rochester City Council Brigit Hurley , senior director of advocacy and program for The Children's Agenda

For Those Facing Alzheimer's, A Controversial Drug Offers Hope

NPR Health Blog - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 2:24pm

A plaque-busting Alzheimer's drug called Aduhelm has yet to prove it can preserve memory and thinking. Even so, its approval by the Food and Drug Administration is making some patients opitimistic.

(Image credit: Kurt Rehwinkel)

Categories: NPR Blogs

For Those Facing Alzheimer's, A Controversial Drug Offers Hope

WXXI US News - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 2:24pm
Soon after Phillip Lynn got married in 2014, he began to forget things. He'd repeat himself. He'd get lost in places close to the couple's home in a suburb of St. Louis. Then in 2016, his spouse, Kurt Rehwinkel, realized that Lynn's memory problems had become more severe. They'd just visited some friends who'd gone to Hawaii with them three months earlier. When they'd talked about the trip, Lynn had become confused. "I said, 'Oh, do you not do you not remember going to Hawaii and spending time with them and going to see Pearl Harbor and going out to the Arizona Memorial,' " Rehwinkel says. "And he's like, 'No, don't remember any of that.' " Lynn, still in his 50s, was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's in 2017. That same year, he began receiving infusions of an experimental drug called aducanumab that he and Rehwinkel believe has halted or even reversed his memory loss. In early June, the Food and Drug Administration approved the drug, based on its ability to reduce the sticky

The U.S. Has Hit 600,000 COVID Deaths, More Than Any Other Country

WXXI US News - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 1:25pm
More than 15 months since the first confirmed death due to COVID-19 in the U.S., the coronavirus pandemic has claimed more than 600,000 lives across the country. But that trend has slowed from thousands to hundreds per day in recent weeks, thanks largely to the ready availability of vaccines. Over the winter, the nation was adding about 100,000 deaths each month. But as more and more people were vaccinated — particularly older Americans — the death rate fell precipitously. There are now about 375 deaths per day on average — down from more than 3,000 per day in January. Worldwide, the U.S. still is reporting the greatest total deaths, followed by Brazil, India and Mexico. The total global death toll stands at 3.8 million. The U.S. death toll, according to Johns Hopkins University, stood at 600,012 on Tuesday afternoon. Even so, the cumulative number of deaths in the country clearly shows the recent positive impact of vaccines: Barely a month passed between 400,000 and a half-million

WATCH: Gov. Andrew Cuomo's briefing - June 15

WXXI US News - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 12:00pm
Gov. Andrew Cuomo holds a COVID-19 briefing from New York City at 12:15 p.m.

A former Warren top aide endorses Evans for mayor

WXXI US News - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 11:52am
A former top aide to Mayor Lovely Warren on Tuesday threw his support behind her opponent in the upcoming Democratic primary election, Malik Evans. Cedric Alexander, who served under Warren as deputy mayor for nearly two years at the outset of her current term, urged voters to cast a ballot for Evans, saying, “It is time to turn the page, time to hit the reset button.” Alexander, who now lives in Florida, joined Evans, who was in Rochester, by video conference to deliver his endorsement. Throughout his announcement, Alexander lauded Evans, a City Council member whom he has known since Evans was a high school student, as a “family man,” and someone of “character” and “moral fiber” who could restore confidence in city residents and Rochester’s reputation on a national stage. “You have a great community there, a community that is still envied by many people,” Alexander said. “But we also have an image issue, and not just an image issue, but a problem there that is rooted in things that we

Brazil's Main COVID Strategy Is A Cocktail Of Unproven Drugs

WXXI US News - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 11:40am
In January, Thalita Rocha stood by her mother-in-law, Maria da Cruz Lima, at a public health clinic in Manaus, Brazil. Lima, a 67-year-old retired nurse, had caught the highly contagious COVID-19 gamma variant (formerly called P.1) assailing the Amazon's largest city. She was waiting for a spot to open up at an intensive care unit but was feeling optimistic — a nurse had started her on oxygen, and she seemed to be improving. An oximeter clipped onto Lima's index finger measured her blood oxygen saturation and was finally showing healthy levels, around 98%. That afternoon, though, Rocha noticed her mother-in-law's skin turning purple. Lima also broke out in a cold sweat and was feeling breathless. A sense of panic filled the room. Lima was not the only one: The oxygen at the unit had run out. An hour later, a police car showed up at the door with two extra tanks. A team of young men hauled the heavy 5-foot tanks into the clinic. Patients took turns breathing in the lifesaving gas. For

America's Top Evangelical Group Is Deciding If They're Further Right Than Trump

WXXI US News - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 11:33am
Southern Baptists are gathered this week in Nashville, Tenn., for an annual meeting that could prove a turning point as the faithful square off on an array of divisive issues that some fear could drive a wedge into the largest Protestant denomination in the United States. Tuesday marks the first full day for the event in which the voting members of the Southern Baptist Convention could tackle high-profile issues including racial discrimination, gender inequality and sexual abuse. The organization is one of the country's most politically influential. It has long aligned itself with conservative causes, and top evangelicals in the convention enthusiastically backed former President Donald Trump. This week, the Southern Baptist Convention's voting members will choose a new leader — a decision that could either signal a continuation of the status quo or set the stage for a more conservative ideological shift. Ronnie Floyd (center), president and CEO of the Southern Baptist Convention's

Rhinos add global soccer star Jamie Vardy as co-owner; plans relaunch in 2022

WXXI US News - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 11:17am
The last time the Rochester Rhinos were on the field was 2017. The club announced today that it plans a rebirth in 2022, with a global soccer star as part of the ownership group that includes David and Wendy Dworkin who bought the club in 2016. The Rhinos announced Tuesday that Jamie Vardy has purchased a minority stake in the club. Vardy led Leicester City to an improbable run to the English Premier League championship in 2014 and has played for England in international competition. Vardy, 34, will continue to play for Leicester City. “I can’t thank Leicester enough for allowing me to do this,” Vardy said in a statement from the Rhinos. “They know, and I know, that it will not in any way distract me from my priority, which is helping Leicester to be successful and scoring goals in the Premier League for many more years to come.” The Dworkins note that Vardy has had an interest in the Rhinos for the past two years. “This is a huge coup for Rochester and the Rhinos,” David Dworkin

Coming up on Connections: Tuesday, June 15

WXXI US News - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 11:02am
First hour: Members of Rochester City Council on the city's proposed budget Second hour: Discussing how racial disparities affect rates of domestic violence

A 3rd Dose Of COVID Vaccines May Boost Immunity For Transplant Recipients

NPR Health Blog - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 10:27am

The COVID vaccines haven't proved very effective for people living with organ transplants. But getting a third dose of the mRNA vaccines gave a big bump in antibody levels in a new study.

(Image credit: Joseph Prezioso /AFP via Getty Images)

Categories: NPR Blogs

A 3rd Dose Of COVID Vaccines May Boost Immunity For Transplant Recipients

WXXI US News - Tue, 06/15/2021 - 10:27am
A small new study offers a glimmer of hope that giving organ transplant recipients a third dose of the COVID-19 vaccine could boost their protection against the coronavirus. That's important because prior research has shown that nearly half of organ transplant recipients failed to show any antibody response even after two doses of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine. And even in transplant recipients who showed an antibody response to vaccination, that response was often more muted than in people with healthy immune systems. That has led doctors to advise these patients not to assume that vaccination equals immunity. More than 400,000 people in the U.S. are living with organ transplants, according to the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. In the new study, published this week in the Annals of Internal Medicine , researchers from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine tracked 30 organ transplant recipients who got a third dose of COVID-19 vaccines. They found that one-third of the
Syndicate content