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Updated: 9 min 20 sec ago

RMSC exhibit honors generations of women who changed Rochester and the world

Tue, 11/24/2020 - 5:00am
An expansive, diverse exhibit at the Rochester Museum & Science Center is an homage to the contributions of generations of pioneering local women. "The Changemakers: Rochester Women Who Changed the World," opened on Nov. 20. Featuring artifacts, authentic objects, and immersive experiences to capture the stories of more than 200 women, it may be one of the largest indoor exhibits in the museum's history. "When you start to assemble the evidence of all of these changemakers' work into 7,000 square feet of space, it's really undeniable that their efforts have impacted all areas of our lives and transformed both our region and the world,” said Kathryn Murano Santos, RMSC's senior director of collections and exhibitions.” The exhibit showcases several time-honored heroes of Rochester and upstate New York: Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth. It also highlights the visionary and trailblazing work of contemporary history makers. A wall-sized

RMSC exhibit honors generations of women who changed Rochester and the world

Tue, 11/24/2020 - 5:00am
An expansive, diverse exhibit at the Rochester Museum & Science Center is an homage to the contributions of generations of pioneering local women. "The Changemakers: Rochester Women Who Changed the World," opened on Nov. 20. Featuring artifacts, authentic objects, and immersive experiences to capture the stories of more than 200 women, it may be one of the largest indoor exhibits in the museum's history. "When you start to assemble the evidence of all of these changemakers' work into 7,000 square feet of space, it's really undeniable that their efforts have impacted all areas of our lives and transformed both our region and the world,” said Kathryn Murano Santos, RMSC's senior director of collections and exhibitions. The exhibit showcases several time-honored heroes of Rochester and upstate New York: Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth. It also highlights the visionary and trailblazing work of contemporary history makers. A wall-sized

Graphic novelist Dave Chisholm chases jazz legend Charlie Parker

Sun, 11/08/2020 - 5:26pm
Anyone who knows anything about jazz sooner or later lands on the story of Charlie “Bird” Parker getting out of six months of detox and blowing the roof off a Los Angeles club with a legendary after-hours performance in 1947. His show that night at Jack’s Basket Room was said to have been the saxophonist’s greatest of his life. No photos were taken. No recordings were captured. And two years ago the building burned to the ground. But there is lore -- loads of colorful lore -- and Rochester graphic novelist and jazz trumpeter Dave Chisholm mined it for his latest work, “Chasin’ the Bird: Charlie Parker in California,” a commission from Parker’s estate to celebrate what would have been the icon’s centennial birthday. The novel, created with colorist Peter Markowski, comes out in October as a companion to the album “Bird in LA,” which features never-before-released recordings of Parker during his celebrated swing of the West Coast toward the end of his too-short life. “It was such a

The greatest Andy Warhol story never told

Fri, 11/06/2020 - 11:40am
“Season of Warhol,” the newest exhibit at Rochester’s Memorial Art Gallery , is a major event for the city’s art scene that explores Andy Warhol’s wild ride. On display are samples of his vibrant pop art, tributes to his fascination with film and television, and goofy cow wallpaper juxtaposed with an image of the electric chair used to execute Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. To the museum’s director, Jonathan Binstock, the pop artist was “probably the most influential artist of the 20th century, and probably the most prolific artist of all time.” Two grand statements. And here’s another: With his signature celebrity portraits — like a saucy Marilyn Monroe exploding in color — Warhol was probably the most celebrity-conscious artist of all time. Which is what makes the story of Warhol’s camaraderie and would-collaboration with Armand Schaubroeck, a co-owner of Rochester’s iconic House of Guitars, so intriguing. “He helped me,” Schaubroeck says, “and I was nobody.” Schaubroeck wasn’t a

Rochester musicians revive an old hit with very current themes to spread message of inclusion

Mon, 10/26/2020 - 4:00am
A Rochester musician says he was inspired to do something to lift people's spirits during a time of distress and separation. Billy Goodness, drummer and vocalist for the band "The Klick," says the idea came to him in a dream. "I literally woke up one night ... I guess, one morning at about 3 a.m.," he says, "and this whole thing was playing it my head, but I heard it with this choir, this chorus." It was Robert Palmer's 1978 hit, "Every Kinda People." Even though the lyrics are 42 years old, they still resonate in this time of heightened awareness of racial injustice and political division. Ooh, it takes every kind of people To make what life's about, yeah Every kind of people To make the world go 'round Someone's looking for a lead In his duty to a King or creed Protecting what he feels is right Fights against wrong with his life There's no profit in deceit Honest men know that Revenge do not taste sweet Whether yellow, black or white Each and every man's the same inside Goodness

Protest chronicler Martin Hawk is under pressure ... and under fire

Sat, 10/10/2020 - 4:00am
Until this summer, the coat rack in Martin Hawk’s home was a spot to set his keys and wallet and other everyday personal items. Now, it’s a place for his gas mask. “None of us were prepared for the tear gas and the pepper spray,” Hawk says. Hawk is a photographer embedded in what he calls the “battleground” of downtown Rochester, documenting the Black Lives Matter demonstrations that have rattled the halls of power and earned international media attention. In some ways, the 28-year-old Hawk is like the scores of video journalists who take the streets nightly to capture the unrest. But Hawk has no media credentials, and could better be described as an artist and a concerned citizen who is, as he put it, treading the “intersectionality between arts and activism.” “I felt compelled to be just another person with a camera, just understanding how important it is to capture all this,” Hawk says. “It’s a watershed moment not just for the world, but also for Rochester.” Hawk is working with

New visitor center (and the Taj Mahal) debut at George Eastman Museum

Thu, 10/08/2020 - 3:24pm
When visitors arrive at the George Eastman Museum, they’ll now be greeted by a 48-feet-long and more than 14-feet-high image of the Taj Mahal. It’s the first of the Eastman Kodak Company’s iconic Colorama photos gracing the museum’s parking lot. The evolution of the George Eastman House into a world-class photography museum has been an ongoing process. The public gets its first look at the latest incarnation Saturday, with not only the Colorama billboard, but the opening of the new Thomas Tischer Visitor Center and the dramatic new Colorama display at the photography pioneer’s former home on East Avenue. “The goal of this was to create a much more central, welcoming, accessible entrance to the museum that really pulls all aspects of the museum together,” says Eliza Kozlowski, director of marketing and engagement at the museum. On Wednesday afternoon, she took the opportunity to discuss the renovations at the museum, first ducking into Eastman’s old pottery shed, then relocating indoors

ImageOut 2020 comes down to the final reel

Thu, 10/08/2020 - 9:51am
The task of booking films for Rochester’s ImageOut LGBT Film Festival has been unfolding like a good thriller: It’s all coming down to the final reel. The coronavirus pandemic’s chokehold on the arts has not ignored the film industry. For the most part, this year festivals have gone virtual, of course, with ImageOut running Oct. 8 through 18, in your living room. One of the event’s centerpiece films has already won accolades at the Toronto International Film Festival. “It’s called ‘The Obituary of Tunde Johnson,’ and it’s like ‘Groundhog Day,’ ” says Michael Gamilla, referring to the 1993 film starring Bill Murray. “You know, where things keep happening over and over, but it’s about the struggle of a young man facing police brutality.” In “The Obituary of Tunde Johnson,” the conflict is not a narcissistic weatherman’s existential struggle with himself, but a gay, Nigerian-American man’s tragic encounter with police. “I think it’s very timely, especially with what’s going on in our own

Steinem's words and work resound in Gloria: A Life

Wed, 10/07/2020 - 4:57am
Feminist, journalist, and social activist Gloria Steinhem has been the face of the women's movement since the 1960s. The producer of a new play presented by the Jewish Community Center's CenterStage said even a global pandemic can't silence Steinem's voice.