Move to Include coverage on WXXINews.org

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MOVE TO INCLUDE is a partnership between WXXI and the Golisano Foundation designed to promote inclusion for people with intellectual and physical disabilities. Through programming and special events, WXXI and the Golisano Foundation look to build a more inclusive community by inspiring and motivating people to embrace different abilities and include all people in every aspect of community life. Share your thoughts with us here
Updated: 39 min 33 sec ago

Defining accessibility in STEM college programs

Mon, 08/13/2018 - 7:00am
Luticha Doucette always knew she wanted to be a scientist, even if no one else thought she could do it. "I was very much discouraged from going into the sciences. People would be like, 'Well, don’t you want to be a teacher?' And I would be like, yeah, teachers are great, but that’s not what my heart was in."

Colleagues and community mourn sudden death of Tristram Smith, autism research pioneer

Fri, 08/10/2018 - 12:11pm
A local autism researcher is being remembered as a pioneer in the field whose work significantly changed the approach to autism spectrum disorder. Tristram Smith died of a heart attack on Monday. He was 57. “His brain was a national treasure,” said Susan Hyman, M.D., chief of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at URMC. “It was because of his work that families could have the hope that their children would gain skills. It really has changed how we in Rochester and nationally treat young children with autism." Smith's work in the early 1990s shifted the focus of the treatment approach to autism from psychotherapy to behavioral intervention. "He just knew that there were ways to connect with people with autism and he felt it was up to him to uncover those things for the rest of us,” said Rachel Rosner, whose 20 year old son and 16 year old daughter are on the autism spectrum. She met Smith when he arrived in town to work at the University of Rochester Medical Center in 2000. Her son

RIT working to foster inclusion in the sciences

Fri, 08/03/2018 - 4:47pm
Laurel Hunter spells her last name, "H-U-N-T-E-the sound a pirate makes." She has a lisp and is the daughter of a deaf adult. "I can’t always hear the difference between certain sounds," she says. "That means partly that I can’t hear accents and partly that I can’t say my own name!" Hunter identifies as diverse in a few other ways besides just the way she speaks. And ordinarily, that might deter her from studying the sciences. But, she came from a long line of science and math professionals, so she decided to major in physics at RIT -- even though she’s in the minority. "Going into the next semester there are going to be maybe two girls total in the room with me and that can be a little bit daunting. You sometimes feel like when you ask a question you’re not just asking for you, you’re asking a question that people are going to think, 'Oh, girls just don’t understand how this works.' " This summer, Hunter says she didn’t feel that way. She was part of RIT’s Inclusive Excellence summer

WATCH: Supporting families with autism during a crisis

Tue, 07/24/2018 - 1:16pm
https://youtu.be/AOW-CcB1LK8 The death of 14-year-old Trevyan Rowe continues to haunt the Rochester community. It was on March 11th when the teen’s body was recovered from the Genesee River. Trevyan had autism. When he got off the school bus on the morning of March 8th to attend the RCSD’s School 12, he apparently never entered the building and wandered away. As to how this could have happened, accusations ensue. But working to find ways to ensure it doesn’t happen again has driven the work of lead partners in the Golisano Autism Center. They have developed a new plan being implemented this summer to support families with autism in crisis situations.

WATCH: Supporting families with autism during a crisis

Tue, 07/24/2018 - 1:16pm
https://youtu.be/AOW-CcB1LK8 The death of 14-year-old Trevyan Rowe continues to haunt the Rochester community. It was on March 11th when the teen’s body was recovered from the Genesee River. Trevyan had autism. When he got off the school bus on the morning of March 8th to attend the RCSD’s School 12, he apparently never entered the building and wandered away. As to how this could have happened, accusations ensue. But working to find ways to ensure it doesn’t happen again has driven the work of lead partners in the Golisano Autism Center. They have developed a new plan being implemented this summer to support families with autism in crisis situations.

WATCH: Rethinking how to help families with autism; diversifying the legal field

Fri, 07/20/2018 - 5:28pm
https://youtu.be/2tk7TePDtlI The tragic death of a city teen is causing a community to rethink how it assists families with autism. On this edition of Need to Know we learn about the work to bring support and crisis services to those in need. Also on the show, it’s known as one of the least diverse professions in our nation. We’ll hear about efforts to diversify the local legal field. And from a distance, her pieces look like landscape paintings. Up close, something else jumps out at you. Don’t miss the work of artist Victoria Connors.

WATCH: Rethinking how to help families with autism; diversifying the legal field

Fri, 07/20/2018 - 5:28pm
https://youtu.be/2tk7TePDtlI The tragic death of a city teen is causing a community to rethink how it assists families with autism. On this edition of Need to Know we learn about the work to bring support and crisis services to those in need. Also on the show, it’s known as one of the least diverse professions in our nation. We’ll hear about efforts to diversify the local legal field. And from a distance, her pieces look like landscape paintings. Up close, something else jumps out at you. Don’t miss the work of artist Victoria Connors.

Health disparities put deaf community at risk

Thu, 07/19/2018 - 9:13am
Deaf individuals are up to seven times as likely as their hearing peers to have heart disease, high blood pressure, and strokes. That's according to research from RIT's National Technical Institute for the Deaf and the University of Michigan. Professor Peter Hauser, director of NTID's Center on Cognition and Language, recently reported to a UN committee in Geneva, Switzerland about the problem. Hauser said, through an interpreter, these health disparities are the result of knowledge gaps in the deaf community. "Hearing people, normally the more educated they are, the more they also know about health issues. But that's not true for the deaf community. There are deaf individuals with Master's degrees and PhDs who don't know as much about health information as their hearing peers." On reason is deaf individuals may not be aware of their family's medical history because often those conversations happen in spoken English. The same barrier keeps deaf and hard of hearing people from picking

Health disparities put deaf community at risk

Thu, 07/19/2018 - 9:13am
Deaf individuals are up to seven times as likely as their hearing peers to have heart disease, high blood pressure, and strokes. That's according to research from RIT's National Technical Institute for the Deaf and the University of Michigan. Professor Peter Hauser, director of NTID's Center on Cognition and Language, recently reported to a UN committee in Geneva, Switzerland about the problem. Hauser said, through an interpreter, these health disparities are the result of knowledge gaps in the deaf community. "Hearing people, normally the more educated they are, the more they also know about health issues. But that's not true for the deaf community. There are deaf individuals with Master's degrees and PhDs who don't know as much about health information as their hearing peers." On reason is deaf individuals may not be aware of their family's medical history because often those conversations happen in spoken English. The same barrier keeps deaf and hard of hearing people from picking

Rochester Police Sgt. runs for 50 hours to help Special Olympians

Fri, 07/13/2018 - 5:42pm
A Rochester Police Sergeant is running a very long way this weekend in an effort to raise money for Special Olympics. Brett Sobieraski started running on Friday from Buffalo and will run along or near the Erie Canal all the way to Syracuse, where he expects to finish up late Sunday morning. His goal is to run for 50 hours, to help celebrate the 50th anniversary of Special Olympics. “It’s just a great, inclusive agency and there’s folks that want to compete and participating, but the funding does not always allow that, so if we can get 5, 10, 20 more athletes a chance to compete, than, this is well worth it,” Sobieraski told WXXI News. He says he will stop about every half hour or so for some food and water, but will not be sleeping at all during that run, which will be about 200 miles long. He expects to make a stop in the Rochester area on Scottsville Road early Saturday morning (about 7am). You can also follow the Sobieraski’s run on his Facebook page . As difficult as his run will

Rochester Police Sgt. runs for 50 hours to help Special Olympians

Fri, 07/13/2018 - 5:42pm
A Rochester Police Sergeant is running a very long way this weekend in an effort to raise money for Special Olympics. Brett Sobieraski started running on Friday from Buffalo and will run along or near the Erie Canal all the way to Syracuse, where he expects to finish up late Sunday morning. His goal is to run for 50 hours, to help celebrate the 50th anniversary of Special Olympics. “It’s just a great, inclusive agency and there’s folks that want to compete and participating, but the funding does not always allow that, so if we can get 5, 10, 20 more athletes a chance to compete, than, this is well worth it,” Sobieraski told WXXI News. He says he will stop about every half hour or so for some food and water, but will not be sleeping at all during that run, which will be about 200 miles long. He expects to make a stop in the Rochester area on Scottsville Road early Saturday morning (about 7am). You can also follow the Sobieraski’s run on his Facebook page . As difficult as his run will

Why People With Disabilities Want Bans On Plastic Straws To Be More Flexible

Wed, 07/11/2018 - 8:02am
It was a hot day at the zoo when Jordan Carlson's son, who has motor-planning delays, got thirsty. "We went to the snack bar and found out they had a 'no straw' policy," Carlson says. "It was a hot day and he couldn't drink." Their only option was to leave the park and look for a business that sold drinks with a straw. Without one, her son can't drink beverages. At home they use reusable straws, and she tries to keep some on hand when they leave the house, but "I'm human and sometimes I forget," Carlson explains. People with disabilities have to be much more conscious of what businesses and communities offer, Carlson says. On social media, many people are ecstatic about the crush of cities and businesses pledging to ban plastic straws once and for all. Ever since a video showing a sea turtle with a straw stuck up its nose went viral, campaigns like #StopSucking for a strawless ocean have gained considerable traction. Seattle this month implemented a citywide ban on plastic straws ,

Why People With Disabilities Want Bans On Plastic Straws To Be More Flexible

Wed, 07/11/2018 - 8:02am
It was a hot day at the zoo when Jordan Carlson's son, who has motor-planning delays, got thirsty. "We went to the snack bar and found out they had a 'no straw' policy," Carlson says. "It was a hot day and he couldn't drink." Their only option was to leave the park and look for a business that sold drinks with a straw. Without one, her son can't drink beverages. At home they use reusable straws, and she tries to keep some on hand when they leave the house, but "I'm human and sometimes I forget," Carlson explains. People with disabilities have to be much more conscious of what businesses and communities offer, Carlson says. On social media, many people are ecstatic about the crush of cities and businesses pledging to ban plastic straws once and for all. Ever since a video showing a sea turtle with a straw stuck up its nose went viral, campaigns like #StopSucking for a strawless ocean have gained considerable traction. Seattle this month implemented a citywide ban on plastic straws ,

Health care hub for people with disabilities launches near Rochester

Mon, 07/09/2018 - 2:36pm
Prime Care Coordination, described by its executive director Tracy Boff as “an umbrella organization” for groups that aid people with disabilities, has opened its regional hub in Webster. “This is going to coordinate all of a person’s care including their medical care, behavioral health needs, social needs, their housing — all of their needs,” Boff said. Prime Care, a Medicaid-funded company wholly owned by non-profit agencies, has replaced the Medicaid Service Coordination program, which until July 1 handled medical and social services for people with disabilities. Prime Care Coordination marks a change from a system that had previously been fragmented between different coordinators and offices, to one with a central person to organize a patient’s care, Boff said. “If a medical provider is not aware of a person’s social needs, like a lack of a stable housing situation,” she said, “it is really difficult for that person to follow through with a medical plan.” Advocates for people with

Health care hub for people with disabilities launches near Rochester

Mon, 07/09/2018 - 2:36pm
Prime Care Coordination, described by its executive director Tracy Boff as “an umbrella organization” for groups that aid people with disabilities, has opened its regional hub in Webster. “This is going to coordinate all of a person’s care including their medical care, behavioral health needs, social needs, their housing — all of their needs,” Boff said. Prime Care, a Medicaid-funded company wholly owned by non-profit agencies, has replaced the Medicaid Service Coordination program, which until July 1 handled medical and social services for people with disabilities. Prime Care Coordination marks a change from a system that had previously been fragmented between different coordinators and offices, to one with a central person to organize a patient’s care, Boff said. “If a medical provider is not aware of a person’s social needs, like a lack of a stable housing situation,” she said, “it is really difficult for that person to follow through with a medical plan.” Advocates for people with

New York agency to protect disabled vows more transparency

Thu, 07/05/2018 - 2:22pm
ALBANY — New York's agency tasked with investigating accusations of abuse and neglect against disabled people in state care is promising to improve transparency following years of complaints about conducting nearly all of its work in secret. Denise Miranda took over last year as executive director of the Justice Center for the Protection of People with Special Needs. "I'm very confident that if you go out there and ask folks about the Justice Center they will say that things are different this year than what they've seen before — more transparency, more communication and willingness to have dialogue," she said in an interview with The Associated Press. "I firmly believe that we have an obligation ... to engage with the public and to answer difficult questions." The commitment isn't likely to satisfy critics, including some lawmakers and families of disabled people, who want the Justice Center to be abolished or overhauled. They fault the agency for not doing enough to go after abuse

New York agency to protect disabled vows more transparency

Thu, 07/05/2018 - 2:22pm
ALBANY — New York's agency tasked with investigating accusations of abuse and neglect against disabled people in state care is promising to improve transparency following years of complaints about conducting nearly all of its work in secret. Denise Miranda took over last year as executive director of the Justice Center for the Protection of People with Special Needs. "I'm very confident that if you go out there and ask folks about the Justice Center they will say that things are different this year than what they've seen before — more transparency, more communication and willingness to have dialogue," she said in an interview with The Associated Press. "I firmly believe that we have an obligation ... to engage with the public and to answer difficult questions." The commitment isn't likely to satisfy critics, including some lawmakers and families of disabled people, who want the Justice Center to be abolished or overhauled. They fault the agency for not doing enough to go after abuse

Connections: Disparities in autism diagnosis and treatment

Tue, 07/03/2018 - 3:53pm
We discuss disparities in autism diagnosis and treatment. The death of Trevyan Rowe has pushed the Golisano Autism Center to speed up plans to provide some services to families of children with autism in the City of Rochester. According to the CDC, about 1 in 59 children has been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and the percentage of autism among African American and Hispanic children is nearing the percentage in white children. But African American and Hispanic children are less likely to receive ASD diagnoses and intervention services. Why? Studies point to a number of factors, including parent education, difficulty navigating the medical system, cultural barriers, and more. We talk to the team at the Golisano Autism Center about how they hope to reduce those gaps in the near future. In studio: Rachel Rosner, director of education and support for AutismUp Mary Boatfield, board president for the Golisano Autism Center Melissa Parrish, family navigator for the Golisano

Connections: Disparities in autism diagnosis and treatment

Tue, 07/03/2018 - 3:53pm
We discuss disparities in autism diagnosis and treatment. The death of Trevyan Rowe has pushed the Golisano Autism Center to speed up plans to provide some services to families of children with autism in the City of Rochester. According to the CDC, about 1 in 59 children has been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and the percentage of autism among African American and Hispanic children is nearing the percentage in white children. But African American and Hispanic children are less likely to receive ASD diagnoses and intervention services. Why? Studies point to a number of factors, including parent education, difficulty navigating the medical system, cultural barriers, and more. We talk to the team at the Golisano Autism Center about how they hope to reduce those gaps in the near future. In studio: Rachel Rosner, director of education and support for AutismUp Mary Boatfield, board president for the Golisano Autism Center Melissa Parrish, family navigator for the Golisano

Deaf lens: Workshop offers opportunity to deaf and hard of hearing youth

Mon, 07/02/2018 - 7:16am
The founder of Rochester's first film camp for deaf and hard of hearing youth is offering a workshop at Writers and Books this summer. Speaking through an interpreter, Stacy Lawrence said she wants to share her passion for filmmaking with kids and help them understand what they are capable of. "I want these children to realize that they are in the same company as wonderful deaf artists and deaf poets right here in Rochester, right under our noses." The workshop will include field trips to local deaf landmarks and murals. Lawrence said deaf artists sometimes use specific symbols in their work. "For instance, if you were to see a butterfly in artwork, it's a really big deaf symbol because butterflies are deaf; a lot of people don't know this,” she said. “The same with fish; fish are also deaf." The Deaf Lens Filmmaking Workshop runs from July 9 through the 27. The students will use the studios at Rochester Community Television to edit their film.