National News Content

Bills fall short in breakout season with 38-24 loss to KC

WXXI US News - 35 min 51 sec ago
Josh Allen led the Buffalo Bills to their first AFC championship game in 27 years. He and the rest of the team will need to be better to take the next step. In a season the Bills (15-4) busted numerous slumps by sweeping the New England Patriots for the first time since 1999, and claimed their first division title in 25 years, Allen and Co. came up well short in a 38-24 loss to Patrick Mahomes and the defending Super Bowl champion Kansas City Chiefs on Sunday night. Buffalo's bend-but-don't-break defense wilted, squandering a 9-0 lead by giving up three touchdowns over the span of 10:04 in the second quarter. And Allen simply couldn't keep up. After scoring their first touchdown set up by Taiwan Jones recovering Mecole Hardman's muffed punt at the Kansas City 3, Buffalo settled for field goals on three drives inside the Chiefs 35. The game was essentially over when Allen, facing second-and-10 at the Kansas City 20, was picked off by Rashad Fenton two minutes into the fourth quarter.

Social Media Fueled Russian Protests Despite Government Attempts To Censor

WXXI US News - 3 hours 13 min ago
Protests exploded across Russia over the weekend, fueled largely by videos posted to social media, despite attempts by the Russian government to censor content across various platforms. The protesters braved extreme cold, police brutality and mass arrests, calling for the release of opposition leader Alexei Navalny, who was detained last week shortly after returning to the country. Social media helped spark and organize the protests, after Navalny called on his supporters to take to the streets on Saturday. Videos and posts promoting action quickly went viral, particularly on TikTok, YouTube and Instagram. TikTok videos with the hashtags involving "Free Navalny" and "23 January" garnered more than 200 million combined views by Thursday, according to the news site Open Media . Young people in particular began filming themselves dressing for upcoming rallies, or as The Moscow Times noted, removing Russian President Vladimir Putin's portrait hanging in classrooms and often replacing it

U.S. Tops 25 Million Confirmed Coronavirus Cases

WXXI US News - 5 hours 40 min ago
Almost exactly one year after the first case of the coronavirus was detected in the United States, the country has now reached 25 million confirmed infections. As it has for months, the U.S. remains by far the most coronavirus-riddled country in the world. Data from Johns Hopkins University's Coronavirus Resource Center showed the U.S. passing the tragic marker as of Sunday morning. The true number of cases, however, is likely far higher: Many people become infected but never get tested, so they aren't reflected in the count. The U.S. has more than twice as many confirmed cases as the nation with the second highest count — India, a country with 10 million cases and a population that is four times larger. Nearly 420,000 people in the U.S. have now died from the virus. That's almost double the number of the next highest country, Brazil, which is closing in on 220,000 deaths. The existence of a more infectious variant of the virus could make matters worse, top health officials say. The

Sen. Mark Warner Makes Case For New Pandemic Relief Bill

WXXI US News - 6 hours 12 min ago
MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: And finally today, a few moments with the one, the only, the legend, actress Cicely Tyson. During a career spanning six decades, she's brought to life iconic roles in theater, film and television, from "Sounder" to "The Autobiography Of Miss Jane Pittman" to "Roots" to "How To Get Away With Murder" - roles that have offered previously unseen images of the sweep and humanity of Black life. Now in a new memoir, she finally - finally - sets forth her improbable journey from the typing pool at the Red Cross to award-winning actor and icon of style. Her book is called "Just As I Am." And Cicely Tyson is here with us to tell us more about it. Cicely Tyson, Ms. Tyson, welcome. It's such an honor to have you with us. CICELY TYSON: Thank you. MARTIN: You know, honestly, if someone were to write the story of your life as a novel, I don't think people would believe it. TYSON: (Laughter). MARTIN: I mean, you started modelling the age of 30, when most models are hanging up

Sen. Mitch McConnell's Post-Trump Posturing

WXXI US News - 6 hours 12 min ago
MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: And finally today, a few moments with the one, the only, the legend, actress Cicely Tyson. During a career spanning six decades, she's brought to life iconic roles in theater, film and television, from "Sounder" to "The Autobiography Of Miss Jane Pittman" to "Roots" to "How To Get Away With Murder" - roles that have offered previously unseen images of the sweep and humanity of Black life. Now in a new memoir, she finally - finally - sets forth her improbable journey from the typing pool at the Red Cross to award-winning actor and icon of style. Her book is called "Just As I Am." And Cicely Tyson is here with us to tell us more about it. Cicely Tyson, Ms. Tyson, welcome. It's such an honor to have you with us. CICELY TYSON: Thank you. MARTIN: You know, honestly, if someone were to write the story of your life as a novel, I don't think people would believe it. TYSON: (Laughter). MARTIN: I mean, you started modelling the age of 30, when most models are hanging up

Dallas Mayor On Vaccine Rollout Plans For Residents

WXXI US News - 6 hours 12 min ago
MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: And finally today, a few moments with the one, the only, the legend, actress Cicely Tyson. During a career spanning six decades, she's brought to life iconic roles in theater, film and television, from "Sounder" to "The Autobiography Of Miss Jane Pittman" to "Roots" to "How To Get Away With Murder" - roles that have offered previously unseen images of the sweep and humanity of Black life. Now in a new memoir, she finally - finally - sets forth her improbable journey from the typing pool at the Red Cross to award-winning actor and icon of style. Her book is called "Just As I Am." And Cicely Tyson is here with us to tell us more about it. Cicely Tyson, Ms. Tyson, welcome. It's such an honor to have you with us. CICELY TYSON: Thank you. MARTIN: You know, honestly, if someone were to write the story of your life as a novel, I don't think people would believe it. TYSON: (Laughter). MARTIN: I mean, you started modelling the age of 30, when most models are hanging up

Historian Discusses The Politics That Shape U.S. History In Schools

WXXI US News - 6 hours 12 min ago
MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: And finally today, a few moments with the one, the only, the legend, actress Cicely Tyson. During a career spanning six decades, she's brought to life iconic roles in theater, film and television, from "Sounder" to "The Autobiography Of Miss Jane Pittman" to "Roots" to "How To Get Away With Murder" - roles that have offered previously unseen images of the sweep and humanity of Black life. Now in a new memoir, she finally - finally - sets forth her improbable journey from the typing pool at the Red Cross to award-winning actor and icon of style. Her book is called "Just As I Am." And Cicely Tyson is here with us to tell us more about it. Cicely Tyson, Ms. Tyson, welcome. It's such an honor to have you with us. CICELY TYSON: Thank you. MARTIN: You know, honestly, if someone were to write the story of your life as a novel, I don't think people would believe it. TYSON: (Laughter). MARTIN: I mean, you started modelling the age of 30, when most models are hanging up

Finger Lakes COVID-19 infection rate is falling while hospitalization rate remains high

WXXI US News - 7 hours 3 min ago
Monroe County reported 289 new COVID-19 cases on Sunday. There were no new deaths. The 7-day rolling average of new cases is 334 new cases per day. The 7-day rolling average positivity rate for Monroe County is 5.3%. For the Finger Lakes region overall, the positivity rate is 5.52%. That has gone from being among the highest infection rates in the state to one of the lowest. Among the 10 regions in the state, the Finger Lakes is now 8 th highest. Only Central NY and the Southern Tier are lower. But the hospitalization rate for COVID-19 patients is still high. The Finger Lakes and Long Island have the highest hospitalization rates in the state. 692 people in the Finger Lakes Region are hospitalized, 139 of them are in ICU. The percentage of total hospital beds available in the Finger Lakes region on a 7-day rolling average is 33%. The percentage of ICU Beds available in the Finger Lakes region on a 7-day rolling average is 22%. Here is the age breakdown of the latest COVID-19 cases in

Statewide campaign calls for reform to parole system in 2021 legislative session

WXXI US News - 8 hours 37 min ago
A bipartisan criminal justice coalition is launching a statewide public education campaign on parole reform. New Yorkers United for Justice are pushing the state legislature and Gov. Andrew Cuomo to make parole reform a top priority for the 2021 legislative session.

Reports: Genesee County one of the sites Samsung is considering for a new chip plant

WXXI US News - 8 hours 46 min ago
Samsung Electronics reportedly is considering an investment of as much as $17 billion to build a chip-making factory in Arizona, Texas, or New York, and that site in New York is said to be in Genesee County. That’s according to sources quoted by the Wall Street Journal who refer to a “large industrial campus” in Genesee County. While the WSJ story was not specific, that would seem to indicate the potential site might be the 1,250 Western NY Science, Technology and Advanced Manufacturing Park (WNY STAMP) location in the Town of Alabama, which Genesee County Economic Development Center (GCEDC) has been marketing for some years now. The WSJ article says that the proposed Samsung plant would employ up to 1,900 people and aims to be operational by October of 2022. The Journal says that an important factor as to whether Samsung moves ahead with the expansion will be the availability of U.S. federal government incentives to offset those offered by foreign countries as well as cheaper costs in

11 Miners Rescued In China After 2 Weeks Trapped Below Ground

WXXI US News - 12 hours 21 min ago
Eleven miners have been rescued in China after a harrowing two weeks trapped some 2,000 feet below ground. The rescue marked a moment of celebration and relief in what has been an arduous and complex effort to bring the men to safety. One miner has already died and another 10 remain missing. The first miner was rescued shortly after 11 a.m. local time on Sunday. Television footage showed rescuers clapping and cheering as the miner was brought to the surface wearing a blindfold to protect his eyes from the light. He was brought to the hospital for treatment, with his condition described as "extremely weak." Several other miners were seen walking on their own with the help of rescuers before being taken to the hospital. The miners became trapped on Jan. 10 following an unexplained explosion at the Hushan gold mine located in the city of Qixia in China's eastern province of Shandong. It was not until 30 hours later that the accident was reported, leading to the firings of at least two

New Zealand Records 1st Suspected COVID-19 Community Case Since November

WXXI US News - 13 hours 6 min ago
New Zealand has kept its community spread of the coronavirus low by keeping tight border controls, but on Sunday the country of 5 million reported its first suspected community case since November. And officials say it might involve a more transmissible variant of the virus. A 56-year-old woman, who had traveled to Spain and the Netherlands for work late last year, has tested positive for the coronavirus after being in managed isolation for the required 14 days upon her return to New Zealand, the country's Ministry of Health said . She had tested negative twice — on Jan. 2 and Jan. 10 — but began developing symptoms on Jan. 15. Because she tested positive several days after leaving managed isolation, officials suspect her case is a community case. "Further testing is needed, including a serology blood test, to confirm whether the case is new or historical," the ministry said. But it said the initial test results suggest "that it is new and we are treating it as such." Health officials

With Control Of Congress, Democrats Aim To Address Voting Rights

WXXI US News - 15 hours 5 min ago
Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST: Protecting voting rights has been near the top of the Democratic Party's priority list for a while now. And with control of Congress and the presidency, they can finally do something about it. But as NPR's Miles Parks reports, they have to tread very carefully. Whatever they decide to do could determine the future of American politics for years to come. MILES PARKS, BYLINE: In late November, after it was clear Joe Biden had won the presidency, I asked Senator Amy Klobuchar what that would mean for overhauling voting laws in the United States. Klobuchar is the highest-ranking Democrat on the Senate Rules Committee, which has jurisdiction over federal elections. She said Democrats needed to win the Senate, too. AMY KLOBUCHAR: If we win the Georgia Senate races, it will allow us to stop some of this voter suppression. PARKS: Well, Democrats swept those runoffs. They control Congress and the White House. Now they have to

Diplomats Return To State Department As Biden Administration Begins

WXXI US News - 15 hours 5 min ago
Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST: The new administration is also promising to rebuild the State Department. They've brought back some diplomats who were forced out in the early days of the Trump administration to help. But there are big gaps to fill, as NPR's Michele Kelemen reports. MICHELE KELEMEN, BYLINE: Emerita Torres served for a decade in the foreign service until she quit just over a year ago. She says she was just too frustrated with the Trump administration pulling out of international organizations and sidelining career diplomats. EMERITA TORRES: At the time, I was serving at the U.S. mission to the U.N. So I had a front-row seat to this isolation - so, you know, from the Paris Accords to leaving the Human Rights Council and also just the day-to-day sort of instructions we were getting really to treat many of our allies like adversaries. We weren't engaging with them in dialogue. But we were bullying our way through. KELEMEN: For Chris

U.S. Government Sees Wave Of Catholic Leaders

WXXI US News - 15 hours 5 min ago
Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST: Joe Biden is not the only Catholic to hold the reins of power right now - Speaker Nancy Pelosi, six Supreme Court justices, some eight of Biden's Cabinet picks and nearly a third of the lawmakers on Capitol Hill. It is a sea change in the political representation of a faith that not so long ago was viewed with suspicion in the United States. Joining us to discuss this wave of Catholic representation in U.S. government is Steven Millies. He's a professor of theology at the Catholic Theological Union. And he joins us now from his home in Evergreen Park, Ill. Welcome to the program. STEVEN MILLIES: Thanks. It's great to be here. GARCIA-NAVARRO: President Biden's inauguration events foregrounded the Catholic faith. Cardinal Wilton Gregory prayed at the remembrance for COVID-19 victims. Father Leo Donovan delivered the invocation during the actual inauguration. And there were masses, prayer services throughout the week. What

Politics Chat: Biden To Sign More Executive Orders In First Full Week As President

WXXI US News - 15 hours 5 min ago
LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST: President Biden is beginning his first full week in office. He's been on calls with world leaders - Canada and Mexico Friday, the U.K. yesterday - and he's expected to sign more executive actions over the course of this week. And, of course, his team is reaching out to Congress, where the fate of his massive economic relief package will be decided. So let's turn now to NPR's Ayesha Rascoe, who is at our microphone at the White House. Hello, Ayesha. AYESHA RASCOE, BYLINE: Hello. GARCIA-NAVARRO: So many of the orders Biden has been signing are part of a plan he laid out for his first 10 days. What are we expecting this week? And have there been any significant sort of deviations from the priorities we heard about? RASCOE: Not really. Biden's chief of staff, Ron Klain, had laid out this plan for the first 10 days. They've generally been sticking with it. This week is supposed to be focused a lot on equity. This is something that Biden has talked a lot about,

Rep. Joaquin Castro Talks Trump's Impeachment

WXXI US News - 15 hours 5 min ago
Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST: So we're going to turn now to the other big story coming up this week, and that is the impending impeachment trial in the Senate of the former President Trump. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has named nine House members to present the case for impeachment to the Senate when former President Trump's trial starts in two weeks. Texas Congressman Joaquin Castro is one of them, and he joins us now. Good morning. JOAQUIN CASTRO: Good morning. Great to be with you. GARCIA-NAVARRO: So the article you're presenting makes specific reference - right? - to Trump's January 6 speech that preceded the sacking of the Capitol. And it also talks about Trump's discussion with Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger to change that state's results. What is not mentioned is anything like this weekend's New York Times reporting that alleges Trump tried to get the Department of Justice to push the lie about election fraud or the Wall Street

Protests Erupt Across Russia Demanding Release Of Alexei Navalny

WXXI US News - 15 hours 5 min ago
Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST: In Russia this weekend, people turned out in cities all across the country to demand the release of opposition leader Alexei Navalny, who was jailed after returning to Moscow a week ago. Navalny had been in Germany, where he sought treatment after being poisoned with a rare nerve agent, a poisoning he blames on President Vladimir Putin. NPR's Lucian Kim reports from Moscow. LUCIAN KIM, BYLINE: The first protests started on Russia's Pacific coast when Moscow was still sound asleep. Hours later, when protesters got to Pushkin Square just a mile from the Kremlin, they were met by police in riot gear. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: (Speaking non-English language). KIM: Police warned it was an illegal gathering and started making isolated arrests. That's when I met Anton Baranov (ph), a designer. ANTON BARANOV: (Speaking non-English language). KIM: "I'm afraid of getting arrested, but I'm ready for it,

After The Capitol Riot, Officials Promise To Crack Down On Extremism In The Military

WXXI US News - 15 hours 5 min ago
Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST: Two weeks after a violent mob carried racist symbols into the Capitol, Army General Lloyd Austin, now the first Black Secretary of Defense, was on Capitol Hill for his confirmation hearing. Austin told senators he is aware that some in the mob had connections to the military, and he promised to crack down. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) LLOYD AUSTIN: The job of the Department of Defense is to keep America safe from our enemies, but we can't do that if some of those enemies lie within our own ranks. GARCIA-NAVARRO: But as NPR's Quil Lawrence reports, the military has been making similar promises for years, with so far little to show. QUIL LAWRENCE, BYLINE: Dozens of vets or still-serving military took part in the January 6 attack on Congress. Another dozen members of the National Guard were removed from the detail of guarding President Joe Biden's inauguration, at least two for extremist connections. With a million

What's Next For The U.S. After Rejoining The Paris Climate Agreement

WXXI US News - 15 hours 5 min ago
Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST: Hours after being sworn in last week, President Biden took his first official steps to address climate change. He revoked a permit for a controversial oil pipeline and rejoined the Paris climate agreement, which the Trump administration had withdrawn from. To talk about the shift and what more to expect, we're joined now by Nathan Rott, a member of NPR's climate team. Good morning. NATHAN ROTT, BYLINE: Hey. Good morning. GARCIA-NAVARRO: So let's start with the big headline, rejoining the Paris climate agreement - significant in principle, but does it really mean anything? ROTT: Yeah, well, I mean, look. It means the U.S. isn't on the outside looking in when it comes to international efforts to stave off, you know, catastrophic climate change. So that's pretty significant, you know? Nearly 200 countries signed on to the Paris accord, which aims to limit global warming to a, let's say, quasi maybe manageable level. And the
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