WXXI News

Cuomo, warning of virus second wave, appeals directly to drug company for vaccine doses  

WXXI US News - 2 hours 18 min ago
New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is warning of a dangerous second wave of the COVID-19 virus, as new, more contagious strains have begun to infiltrate the U.S.. And, as New York State struggles with its vaccination roll out, Cuomo says he’s asking on of the major manufacturers if the state can buy vaccines directly.

Cuomo, warning of virus second wave, appeals directly to drug company for vaccine doses  

WXXI Capitol Bureau Report - 2 hours 18 min ago
New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is warning of a dangerous second wave of the COVID-19 virus, as new, more contagious strains have begun to infiltrate the U.S.. And, as New York State struggles with its vaccination roll out, Cuomo says he’s asking on of the major manufacturers if the state can buy vaccines directly.
Categories: WXXI News

Joe Biden's inauguration coverage on Wednesday

WXXI US News - 3 hours 22 min ago
WXXI News will bring you coverage of Joe Biden's inauguration as the 46th President of the United States. Here is where you can find our coverage on Wednesday: Television: WXXI (cable 11/OTA 21.1) coverage begins at 10:30 a.m. Radio: WXXI AM 1370 & FM 107.5 coverage begins at 11 a.m. Digital: Coverage on WXXINews.org (streaming audio & video) and the WXXI News Facebook page

Siena Poll: Over the last year, NYers views on race relations little changed

WXXI Local Stories - 3 hours 42 min ago
A new survey from Siena College shows that only about a third of New Yorkers think that race relations in the state are either excellent or good. That compares to about two-thirds of them who say that race relations are either fair or poor. Overall, Siena pollster Steve Greenberg says he’s surprised the survey results have not changed much over the last 12 months. “Given the discussion about race that has gone on in this country over the course of the last year, that there was literally no movement in the last 6 months and very little movement in the last 12 months on New Yorkers views on race.” Greenberg said that the surveys of New Yorkers on racial issues show that, "It’s gone up and down a couple points between 2015 and today over the last 6 years. But really the turning point was 2014 and that was the year of Eric Garner in Staten Island and Michael Brown in Ferguson. And that really affected the way Black and white New Yorkers thought about race.” The Siena survey also shows that

Siena Poll: Over the last year, NYers views on race relations little changed

WXXI US News - 3 hours 42 min ago
A new survey from Siena College shows that only about a third of New Yorkers think that race relations in the state are either excellent or good. That compares to about two-thirds of them who say that race relations are either fair or poor. Overall, Siena pollster Steve Greenberg says he’s surprised the survey results have not changed much over the last 12 months. “Given the discussion about race that has gone on in this country over the course of the last year, that there was literally no movement in the last 6 months and very little movement in the last 12 months on New Yorkers views on race.” Greenberg said that the surveys of New Yorkers on racial issues show that, "It’s gone up and down a couple points between 2015 and today over the last 6 years. But really the turning point was 2014 and that was the year of Eric Garner in Staten Island and Michael Brown in Ferguson. And that really affected the way Black and white New Yorkers thought about race.” The Siena survey also shows that

3 Questions And The Emerging Answers About COVID-19 Vaccine Protection

WXXI US News - 3 hours 43 min ago
As the COVID-19 vaccine rolls out, three big questions loom. First, can someone who has been vaccinated still spread the disease? Second, will the vaccine remain effective as the virus itself evolves? And third, how long will the vaccine's protection last? Answers to these questions lie in our immune systems. And the answers aren't straightforward because our immune systems are both remarkably adept and remarkably challenging to predict. Let's start with the first question, about whether people who are vaccinated can still spread the disease. Marion Pepper , an immunologist at the University of Washington, says that's not just an open question for this vaccine, but for vaccines in general. "I think it's hard to say because we're constantly being bombarded by different pathogens and we don't know when your immune system is responding," she says. We may have infections that don't make us sick, so we never know about them. But we could be spreading disease. When a person is infected – or

WATCH: Gov. Andrew Cuomo COVID-19 briefing - January 18

WXXI US News - 4 hours 19 min ago
Gov. Andrew Cuomo delivers a briefing on COVID-19 at approximately 11:30 a.m.

Biden Taps Veteran Financial Regulators To Lead SEC, CFPB

WXXI US News - 4 hours 43 min ago
President-elect Joe Biden will nominate Gary Gensler to lead the Securities and Exchange Commission and Rohit Chopra to head the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, according to a statement from Biden's transition team Monday morning. The pair's selection marks a triumph for progressives who have pushed for more aggressive oversight of the financial industry. Gensler is a top financial regulator known for taking on big banks and trading houses after the Dodd-Frank financial reforms enacted after the 2008 financial crisis. A former Goldman Sachs executive, Gensler has an extensive career in government, serving as under secretary of the treasury for domestic finance from 1999 to 2001 and assistant secretary of the treasury for financial markets from 1997 to 1999. He went on to serve in the Obama administration as the chairman of the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission and was the CFO for Hillary Clinton's 2016 presidential campaign. Chopra, an ally of Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D

WXXI Business Report: PPP loans for the next round of pandemic relief

WXXI US News - 5 hours 1 min ago
In the latest WXXI Business Report: -An executive with Canandaigua National Bank & Trust talks about the latest PPP loans for area businesses. -A Rochester-based company that works on zero-waste solutions has acquired a local composting company. -FLCC announces new apprenticeship programs in manufacturing.

Data Scientist Rebekah Jones, Facing Arrest, Turns Herself In To Florida Authorities

WXXI US News - 5 hours 29 min ago
Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET Rebekah Jones, the data scientist who helped create Florida's COVID-19 dashboard, has turned herself in to police, in response to an arrest warrant issued by the state. Jones is charged with one count of "offenses against users of computers, computer systems, computer networks and electronic devices," the Florida Department of Law Enforcement said in a statement Monday. Jones has said she lost her job after refusing requests to manipulate data to suggest Florida was ready to ease coronavirus restrictions. Jones says she's being punished for continuing to speak out about how Gov. Ron DeSantis is handling COVID-19, citing her arrest and a raid on her home last month . FDLE said in its statement that "evidence retrieved from a search warrant on December 7 shows that Jones illegally accessed the system sending a message to approximately 1,750 people and downloaded confidential FDOH data and saved it to her devices." According to Jones, Florida investigators " found

Funding hold up threatens New York’s progress against AIDS

WXXI US News - 5 hours 30 min ago
(Binghamton-WSKG) 2020 was the year of the COVID-19 pandemic, but it was also the target for New York to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Ending it meant fewer than 750 infections per year. On World AIDS day in December , Governor Andrew Cuomo released numbers from 2019 showing the state had “bent the curve” with 2,377 new infections. Although the trend is heading in the right direction, John Barry, Executive Director of the Southern Tier AIDS Program, said the state’s ballooning budget has impacted some harm reduction programs and resulted in new infections, including a recent HIV outbreak in Rochester. According to Barry, the state is withholding some contracts as it waits on COVID-19 aid from the federal government, which might not come. “Because the state has been slow to pay contracts a lot of syringe exchange programs—our three included—are running out of supplies to give people, and when people do not have those supplies they’re forced to reuse them or share them,” Barry said.

Documentary Exposes How The FBI Tried To Destroy MLK With Wiretaps, Blackmail

WXXI US News - 6 hours 35 min ago
From the March on Washington in 1963 up until his assassination in 1968, the FBI engaged in an intense campaign to discredit Martin Luther King Jr. and his work. Film director Sam Pollard chronicles those efforts in the new documentary, MLK/FBI. "The first fear that [FBI director J. Edgar Hoover] had was that King was going to align himself with the Communist Party, which ... J. Edgar Hoover was obsessed with destroying," Pollard says. Pollard's documentary is based on newly declassified files obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, along with restored archival footage. It shows the government's extensive targeting of King and his associates in the 1960s. The FBI campaign against King began with wiretaps, but quickly ballooned. When wiretaps revealed that King was having extramarital affairs, the FBI shifted their focus to uncover all evidence of his infidelity by bugging and taping him in his hotel rooms and by paying informants to spy on him. Eventually, the FBI penned and

New Program Aims To Bring More Civil Rights Lawyers To The South

WXXI US News - 7 hours 34 min ago
The NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund is launching a scholarship program designed to produce a new team of civil rights advocates working for racial justice in the South. Unveiled on Monday — Martin Luther King Jr. Day — the program will offer free tuition and room and board, a commitment intended to remove barriers for students deterred by the steep costs of law school. Once their program ends, the Marshall-Motley Scholars — named after a pair of the LDF's most preeminent alumni, the late Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and the first Black woman federal judge, Constance Baker Motley — will commit to working on civil rights law in the South for at least eight years. The South remains where the majority of Black people in America live and where the majority of the litigation the LDF pursues is based, its leaders said. "At this moment, the South is a place of tremendous activism, it's a place of political transformation, and it is a region that is in need of a strengthened

Ski Down and Mask Up — Resorts Try To Stay Safe In Pandemic Skiing Boom

WXXI US News - 7 hours 50 min ago
Eager to get out of the house and enjoy the outdoors, more people than ever are hitting the slopes on skis and snowboards. "Oh, yeah. I mean, we sold probably a thousand more season passes this year than we ever had," says John DeVivo, the General Manager of Cannon Mountain in New Hampshire. "We were up about 20% in pass sales." Those passes let skiers or snowboarders ski all season and can cost hundreds or thousands of dollars depending on the resort. DeVivo says there's also strong demand for single-day lift tickets too. "Every lift ticket that we put out there does sell." DeVivo says he'd love to sell more — but to keep things COVID-safe, he's cut off additional season pass sales and is limiting the number of daily lift tickets. Cannon Mountain General Manager John DeVivo skis and rides the chairlifts each day to make sure the safety rules are being followed. He wants to make sure the ski area can stay open and keep upwards of 500 workers employed. Chris Arnold / NPR Looking out

Biden's Inaugural Day Will Be Different Including Trump Will Not Attend

WXXI US News - 8 hours 12 min ago
President-elect Biden's inaugural week kicks off under high security in Washington, D.C., and elsewhere. His team says it's vital that he takes the oath of office outside the Capitol as is tradition.

Security Is On High Alert For Inauguration Week Activities

WXXI US News - 8 hours 12 min ago
NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks with former National Security Council official Javed Ali about the security operation in advance of Inauguration Day, and an FBI warning of armed protests nationwide.

News Brief: Inauguration Day Changes, COVID-19 Roundup, Alexei Navalny

WXXI US News - 9 hours 26 min ago
Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Nation Braces For More Violence Ahead Of Inauguration Day

WXXI US News - 9 hours 26 min ago
Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Some Christians Feel It's A God-Given Mission To Fight On Trump's Behalf

WXXI US News - 9 hours 26 min ago
Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Biden's Inauguration Is Going To Look Very Different. Here's What To Know

WXXI US News - 10 hours 34 min ago
Updated at 1:10p.m. ET The inauguration of Joe Biden as the 46th president of the United States is going to look vastly different than those of his predecessors, given the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and heightened security concerns after a mob of pro-Trump extremists violently breached the U.S. Capitol two weeks ago. There will be no throngs of people massed beneath a platform at the Capitol. Also absent will be President Trump, who's skipping town early. Here's what you can expect on Wednesday. What's the lineup of events? The inaugural ceremonies will begin with the national anthem and invocation around 11:30 a.m. ET. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris is expected to be sworn in by Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor shortly before noon. President-elect Biden will then be sworn in by Chief Justice John Roberts at noon ET on the Capitol's West Front, as is tradition. It is anticipated there will be roughly 1,000 guests in attendance, the majority of whom will be members of
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